Overview

The American Military University Arena is located in Charles Town, West Virginia. This is a multipurpose facility that hosts events in college and professional football, basketball, and hockey. This is a newly structured arena and it has a sitting capacity of 65,000 people. The arena also includes a gymnasium, a modern gym with the best bodybuilding facilities, and a swimming pool. Some of the facilities that exist include parking garages, sports grounds, spectator sitting areas, cafeterias, and sporting facilities. The main focus of the risk analysis will be the sports arena. Due to the number of spectators that the facility can hold at any one given time it is vital that there be enough consideration placed for the safety of the participants and the spectators. The main stakeholders of the sports arena are the university management and administrators because they are directly involved and the sports arena was built in order to support and supplement the income for the university. The other stakeholders are the students especially those who take part in sporting activities. The community is also a stakeholder and since this facility also hosts sporting events for professional football, hockey, and basketball, the residents of the area are also considered to be stakeholders. The state and county government of West Virginia and Charles Town are also stakeholders of the sports arena. The arena has employed enough personnel ranging from first aid caregivers, security guards, parking attendants, ticketing agents, vendors, and service desk personnel. The sports arena has a sitting capacity of 65,000 people, but there has not yet been an occasion when the arena has been full to capacity. The maximum number of spectators has stood at 50,000. For the risk management, the main personnel used will include the university administrators, sports arena personnel, and security personnel.

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Matrix

Risk Matrix

FREQUENCY

SEVERITY

High

Medium

Low

High

· Fans fighting.

· Poor lighting.

· Slipping, tripping, or falling.

· High noise levels.

Medium

· Chemicals or other hazardous substances.

· Extreme weather.

· Parking lot accidents.

Low

· Terrorist attack.

· Food poisoning.

· Electrical shocks.

Risk Transfer Matrix

High

Insurance

· Terrorist Attack.

· Food poisoning.

· Chemicals or other hazardous substances.

· Extreme weather.

Frequency

Low

High

Independent Contractor

Indemnification Clause

· Fans fighting.

· Poor lighting.

· Electrical shocks.

· Slipping, Tripping, or Falling.

· High noise levels.

· Parking lot accidents.

Low

Severity

Financial Treatment and A Reduction Treatment for Each Risk

Risk treatment refers to any action that is taken in order to manage a risk. A terrorist attack would not be easy to predict, but with proper planning, it is easy to mitigate such an attack. The financial treatment for such a risk is ensuring there are enough first aid kits and first aiders present whenever there is an event at the arena. A reduction treatment for a terrorist attack is increasing and having vigilant security personnel. Scanning and inspecting all cars, individuals, and bags should be done before one is allowed access to the facility.

Areas that might have chemical risks should be well denoted and signage used to ensure that individuals accessing these areas are aware of the risk (Alves et al., 2013). The financial treatment for this risk would be to have enough signage. The reduction treatment is to ensure that the area does is well ventilated whenever there is an event taking place.

Food poisoning is a risk that can have a high severity and this is because many people tend to consume the food being sold at the sports arena. The financial treatment for this risk is stocking washrooms with enough hand washing liquids and encouraging employees to wash hands at all times. The reduction treatment would be to have in-service education plan regarding how to handle food.

The risk of fans fighting is eminent in any sports arena and the financial treatment of this risk would be to employ security personnel who would be watching over the fans to ensure that rowdy fans are well controlled (Ruffino, Fiore, & Zanetti, 2013). The reduction treatment is preventing fans who are known to cause fight from entering the arena.

Poor lighting, especially in dark areas, could lead to injury to the spectators or employees. Installing proper lighting and replacing the broken bulb is the financial treatment, while the reduction treatment would be to restrict access to areas that are not well lit.

In order to prevent the risk of extreme weather during a sporting event, it is vital that there is proper weather analysis in order to reduce this risk, this would be the reduction treatment. The financial treatment would be to have a supervisory plan in place for such an occasion and ensure that employees are well trained on how to handle such a huge crowd.

The sports arena has three high-voltage areas. These areas should have proper signage to ensure that individuals understand the risk associated with accessing such an area. The financial treatment of this risk is having constant inspections to ensure no unauthorized individual has accessed the area.

All staircases are fitted with anti-slippery material, but there are still risks of slipping, falling or tripping. The financial treatment would be to ensure that any spillage is wiped immediately. This would require having enough cleaners whenever there is an event. The reduction treatment would be to have warning and information signs for the individuals accessing these areas.

High noise is unavoidable where there is a large crowd of sports fans. The sports arena is bound to have loud noises and the financial treatment for this risk would be to properly warn and educate the spectators of this risk. The reduction treatment might involve placing warning signs at all entry points of the arena.

Parking lot accidents are avoidable if the parking area is well illuminated and there are enough parking attendants to direct drivers. The financial treatment for this risk would be hiring enough attendants to monitor the parking area, and the reduction treatment would be to have clear signs for drivers to reduce speed and signs marking the exits.

Risk Reduction Procedures

Personnel Management

The American Military University sports arena has implemented various policies to ensure that its personnel are not going against the mission and vision of the facility when they are work. It is the policy of the sports arena that no employee should report to work late or drunk. In order to prevent latecomers, the facility has implemented a clock in system that uses the employees’ biometrics i.e. fingerprint to record when they reported for work and when they clocked out. This ensures that employees report to work on time and it prevents the rushing to fill out empty slots at the last minute. As a sports arena the facility should ensure that it has enough personnel to handle the huge crowds that visit the facility whenever there is an event. The only to do this is by ensuring that employees report for work on time and they are at their required station by the time the gates are being opened. Screening employees for drugs and alcohol when they report for work is another policy that has been adopted by the facility. This screening ensures that personnel are not inebriated in any way. This reduces the risks that a drunk employee would have especially when dealing with rowdy or emotional fans. The sports arena also has a policy that restricts employees from smoking when they are at the facility. Smoking has been prevented within the facility not only for the employee but for all visitors because there is a huge risk that a fire could be started by a smoker who throws the cigarette butt aimlessly.

In addition to the above-mentioned policies, the facility also has a strict sexual harassment policy that ensures that no employee is discriminated or harassed sexually. The policy has clearly defined what is allowed and what is considered to be sexual harassment. This policy is not only handed to employees, but there are training that employees attend training them on the effects of sexual harassment and reinforcing the importance of respecting each other irrespective of gender. As stated in the policy, there is zero tolerance for any sexual harassment and all incidents are fully investigated. There is also a confidence clause that ensures that any report of sexual harassment is treated discreetly in order to protect the complainant. A sample sexual harassment policy is provided in appendix A.

Emergency Procedures

The facility’s emergency procedures for dealing with accidental bodily injuries are that the injured individual should be moved to a secluded area where the first aid team can work on the individual without interference. All emergency team workers should have proper protection to ensure there is no transmission or infection when they are administering first aid. An accident form should be filled indicating the procedures that have been carried out and the injury that has occurred. A sample incident report form has been included in Appendix B (League Athletics, 2015). For natural phenomenon spectators should be ushered into the arena where they can cover themselves against the elements the weather. All spectators should be directed and instructed to move in an orderly manner. There should be emergency staff who are trained on how to handle the particular phenomena and the employees should ensure that all the spectators and participating teams remain calm (Sawyer, 2016). Events that take place in the open field should be well guarded and there should be enough emergency exits that are clearly marked. The facility has speakers around and this should be used to direct and inform the participants on the route to use when exiting the open field. When dealing with behavioral problems like rowdy or drunk fans. The emergency procedure is to retrain the offending fan and have them moved to a secure area where they cannot cause harm to others.

Crowd Management

In order to properly manage a large crowd, the facility has included clearly marked areas that direct the crowd. The exits are all marked and they have a light with signage indicating the exit number. The facility has implemented walkways and all the walkways have marking showing or directing the spectators. There are loudspeakers installed around the facility that are used to inform the spectators and visitors. The facility also has personnel who are charged with directing crowds towards their designated sitting or access areas. The facility’s plan is to ensure that all visitors are able to access their respective areas without any disruption and to have a smooth movement of individuals at all times. In order to ensure this, the facility has made the entry and exit points to be easily accessible and there are minimal barriers in these areas.

Compliance with ADA

The facility is in compliance with the ADA guidelines and the ADA checklist form is included in Appendix C. These guidelines ensure that the facility can be accessed and used by persons with disability (Calder & Mulligan, 2014). This is vital to ensure that there is no discrimination based on an individual’s disability. This being a new facility, there is need to ensure that all individuals can access and use the facility without any issue. As the checklist indicates, the facility has provided for parking, sitting areas, washrooms, and changing rooms. There are special washrooms and changing rooms for persons with disability to ensure that they can also participate in the arena’s activities without requiring assistance from others. The parking area also has designated areas that are reserved for disabled individuals and they are clearly marked in order to eliminate any confusion. There are special ramps designed and reserved for persons with wheelchairs. The sitting areas also have the capability to host disabled persons.

Conclusion

This analysis has been carried out in order to establish the risks that the sporting facility can be faced with and the different risks have been analyzed. In the report, a matrix has been developed that has categorized the different risks based on the severity and frequency. The matrix has been further expanded and the transfer of risk has been provided. Each identified risk has been further analyzed and its financial and reduction treatment has been offered with an aim of demonstrating how the risk could be mitigated. The identified risks have not covered all the risks that could face the facility, but an attempt has been made to establish some of the major risks. The report has analyzed and provided accompanying images that inform on the risk being discussed. The personnel employed by the facility have also been analyzed and the different policies implemented within the facility to protect the employees and the facility have also been discussed. Sexual harassment is a grave concern for the facility and this has been fully analyzed and a sample policy has been included. This being a large facility there is need to have proper emergency procedures that are geared towards different emergencies. It is for this reason that three of the main emergencies have been discussed and a sample incident form has been provided for reference purposes. Access to the facility should never be limited and the facility is in compliance with the ADA requirements for accessibility. This ensures that the facility can be accessed and used by all individuals. This report if implemented would ensure that the facility is prepared to handle any emergency and there will be reduced risk of spectator injury. The facility could also be able to attract more events due to its proper risk management.

 

 

References

Alves, C. A., Calvo, A. I., Castro, A., Fraile, R., Evtyugina, M., & Bate-Epey, E. F. (2013). Indoor air quality in two university sports facilities. Aerosol and air quality Research, 13(6), 1723-1730.

Calder, A. M., & Mulligan, H. F. (2014). Measurement properties of instruments that assess inclusive access to fitness and recreational sports centers: a systematic review. Disability and health journal, 7(1), 26-35.

League Athletics. (2015). Accident/Incident Report Form. from http://files.leagueathletics.com/Images/Club/16086/Attachments/accident_incident%20report.pdf

Ruffino, B., Fiore, S., & Zanetti, M. C. (2013). Environmental–sanitary risk analysis procedure applied to artificial turf sports fields. Environmental Science and Pollution Research, 20(7), 4980-4992.

Sawyer, T. L. (2016). Risk Management Toolbox. Journal of Facility Planning, Design, and Management, 4(1).

 

 

Appendices

Appendix A: Incident Report Form

ACCIDENT/INCIDENT REPORT FORM

 

Date of incident: _______________ Time: ________ AM/PM

Location: ____________________________________________

Site Director: _________________________________________

Nature of Event: _______________________________________

Name of injured person: Address: Phone Number(s):

Date of birth: ________________ Male ______ Female _______

Grade ____________ School _________________________________________ Who was injured person? (circle one) Player Spectator Coach

Type of injury:

Details of incident and injury (use back of sheet if necessary):

 

 

 

______

_______ __________________________________________

Parent Present? Yes______No______ Parent Notified? Yes______No______

Paramedics called to scene? Yes _____No _____

Who contacted fire rescue to scene? ________________________________________________

Injury requires transport? Yes _____No _____

Name of physician/hospital: Address:

Physician/hospital phone number:

 

____________________________________________________ __________________

Name and Signature of Person completing this report Date

 

 

Email this completed form to [email protected] within 24 hours of incident

Catholic Youth Sports

PO Box 940176

Maitland, FL 0176

 

 

Appendix B: Completed ADA Checklist

 

 

 

 

ADA Checklist for Existing Facilities

 

 

Sports Activities, Team or Player Seating, Exercise Machines & Equipment, Bowling Lanes, Saunas & Steam Rooms and Shooting Facilities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Project ?????

 

 

Building ?????

 

 

Location ?????

 

 

Date ?????

 

 

Surveyors ?????

 

 

?????

 

 

Contact Information ?????

 

 

?????

 

 

 

 

 

 

Institute for Human Centered Design

www.HumanCenteredDesign.org

 

Copyright © 2016

 

ADA National Network

Questions on the ADA 800-949-4232 voice/tty

 

www.ADAchecklist.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This checklist was produced by the New England ADA Center, a project of the Institute for Human Centered Design and a member of the ADA National Network. This checklist was developed under a grant from the Department of Education, NIDRR grant number H133A060092-09A. However the contents do not necessarily represent the policy of the Department of Education, and you should not assume endorsement by the Federal Government.

Questions or comments on the checklist contact the New England ADA Center at 617-695-0085 voice/tty or [email protected]

For the full set of checklists, including the checklists for recreation facilities visit www.ADAchecklist.org.

Copyright © 2016 ADA Checklist for Existing Materials. You can freely reproduce and distribute this content. Include proper attribution. But you must get permission before using this content as a fee-based product.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Misc. Recreation

Comments

Possible Solutions

 

Sports Activities (2010 Standards – 206 & Ch. 4) Soccer fields, basketball courts, tennis courts, baseball fields, running tracks, skating rinks, etc.

 

S1

Is there an accessible route to each type of sport activity?

 

For exterior routes use the checklist for Priority 1: Approach & Entrance.

 

For interior routes use the checklist for Priority 2: Access to Goods & Services.

|_|Yes |_|No

 

 

 

 

?????

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo #: ?????

• Add a ramp

• Regrade to 1:20 maximum slope

• Widen route

• Change route surface

• Add a platform lift, limited use/ limited application elevator or a regular elevator

 

 

S2

At court sports (tennis, basketball, volleyball, etc.) does at least one accessible route connect both sides of the court?

 

Note: This is particularly important in sports such as tennis, where changing sides is part of the game.

|_|Yes |_|No

 

 

 

?????

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo #: ?????

• Add a ramp

• Regrade to 1:20 maximum slope

• Widen route

• Change route surface

 

 

Team or Player Seating (2010 Standards – 206, 221 & 802) Baseball, hockey, basketball, football, etc.

 

T1

At areas of sport activity, is there an accessible route to each side of team or player seating?

 

For exterior routes use the checklist for Priority 1: Approach & Entrance.

 

For interior routes use the checklist for Priority 2: Access to Goods & Services.

|_|Yes |_|No

 

 

 

 

?????

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo #: ?????

• Add a ramp

• Regrade to 1:20 maximum slope

• Widen route

• Change route surface

• Add a platform lift

 

T2

Is there at least one wheelchair space at team or player seating areas?

|_|Yes |_|No

 

Measurement:

40 inches

 

?????

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo #: ?????

• Add wheelchair space

• ?????

• ?????

 

 

T3

If there is a single wheelchair space, is it at least 36 inches wide?

 

 

|_|Yes |_|No

 

Measurement:

40 inches

 

?????

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo #: ?????

• Alter space

• ?????

• ?????

 

 

T4

If there are 2 adjacent wheelchair spaces, are they each at least 33 inches wide?

 

 

|_|Yes |_|No

 

Measurement:

?????

 

?????

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo #: ?????

• Alter spaces

• ?????

• ?????

 

 

T5

If the wheelchair space can be entered from the front or rear, is it at least 48 inches deep?

 

|_|Yes |_|No

 

Measurement:

?????

 

?????

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo #: ?????

• Alter space

• ?????

• ?????

 

 

T6

If the wheelchair space can only be entered from the side, is it at least 60 inches deep?

 

|_|Yes |_|No

 

Measurement:

?????

 

?????

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo #: ?????

• Alter space

• ?????

• ?????

 

 

T7

Do wheelchair spaces adjoin, but not overlap, accessible routes?

 

 

|_|Yes |_|No

 

 

 

?????

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo #: ?????

• Alter spaces

• ?????

• ?????

 

 

T8

Do wheelchair spaces not overlap circulation paths?

 

Note: The term “circulation paths” means aisle width required by applicable building or life safety codes for the specific assembly occupancy. Where the circulation path provided is wider than the required aisle width, the wheelchair space may intrude into that portion of the circulation path that is provided in excess of the required aisle width.

|_|Yes |_|No

 

 

 

?????

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo #: ?????

• Alter spaces

• ?????

• ?????

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Exercise Machines & Equipment (2010 Standards – 206, 236 & 1004)

 

E1

Is there an accessible route to at least one of each type of exercise machine and equipment?

 

Use the checklist for Priority 2: Access to Goods & Services

 

Note: Most strength training equipment and machines are considered different types. For example, a bench press machine is different from a biceps curl machine. Cardiovascular exercise machines, such as stationary bicycles, rowing machines, stair climbers and treadmills, are all different types.

|_|Yes |_|No

 

 

 

 

?????

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo #: ?????

• Add a ramp

• Regrade to 1:20 maximum slope

• Widen route

• Change route surface

• Add a platform lift, limited use/ limited application elevator or a regular elevator

 

 

E2

Is there clear floor space at least 30 inches wide by at least 48 inches long positioned for transfer or for use by a person seated in a wheelchair next to at least one of each type of exercise machine and equipment?

 

Notes:

1. To make a shoulder press accessible, the clear floor space should be next to the seat. For a bench press, the clear floor space should be centered on the operating mechanisms.

2. Machines and equipment can share clear floor space.

 

3. The exercise equipment and machines do not need to comply with the 2010 Standards specifications for controls and operating mechanism.

|_|Yes |_|No

 

Measurement:

?????

 

 

 

 

 

 

?????

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo #: ?????

• Add clear floor space

• ?????

• ?????

 

 

Bowling Lanes (2010 Standards – 206 & Ch.4)

 

B1

Is there an accessible route to at least 5 percent but no less than one of each type of bowling lane?

 

For interior routes use the checklist for Priority 2: Access to Goods & Services.

|_|Yes |_|No

 

Number:

?????

 

?????

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo #: ?????

• Add a ramp

• Regrade to 1:20 maximum slope

• Widen route

• Change route surface

• Add a platform lift

 

Saunas & Steam Rooms (2010 Standards – 241 & 612)

 

S1

Is there an accessible route to at least one sauna and steam room?

 

If there are separate rooms for men and women, is there an accessible route to at least one for each gender?

 

For interior routes use the checklist for Priority 2: Access to Goods & Services.

|_|Yes |_|No

 

 

|_|Yes |_|No

 

 

 

 

 

 

?????

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo #: ?????

• Add a ramp

• Regrade to 1:20 maximum slope

• Widen route

• Change route surface

• Add a platform lift, limited use/ limited application elevator or a regular elevator

 

 

S2

If there is seating in the room does at least one bench:

 

Have clear floor space at least 30 wide inches by at least 48 inches long at the end of the bench and parallel to the short axis of the bench?

 

Is the clear space free from the swing of the room door?

 

Is the bench seat:

At least 42 inches long?

 

 

 

No less than 20 inches and no greater than 24 inches deep?

 

 

Is the top of the bench seat no less than 17 inches and no greater than 19 inches above the floor or ground?

 

Does the bench have back support or is it affixed to a wall?

 

Does the back extend from a point no more than 2 inches and a point no less than 18 inches above the seat surface?

 

 

|_|Yes |_|No

 

Measurement:

?????

 

|_|Yes |_|No

 

 

 

|_|Yes |_|No

 

Measurement:

?????

 

|_|Yes |_|No

 

Measurement:

?????

 

|_|Yes |_|No

 

Measurement:

?????

 

|_|Yes |_|No

 

 

|_|Yes |_|No

 

Measurement:

?????

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

?????

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo #: ?????

• Move bench

• Replace bench

• Affix bench to wall

• ?????

• ?????

 

 

S3

Is there a clear floor space for a person in wheelchair to turn around in the room, i.e. a circle at least 60 inches in diameter or a T-shaped space within a 60-inch square?

 

Note: A readily removable bench is permitted to obstruct the turning space.

|_|Yes |_|No

 

Measurement:

?????

 

?????

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo #: ?????

• Add space

• Move or remove partitions, fixtures or objects

• ?????

 

Shooting Facilities with Firing Positions (2010 Standards – 243 & 1010)

 

S1

Is there an accessible route to the shooting facility?

 

For exterior routes use the checklist for Priority: 1 Approach & Entrance.

For interior routes use the checklist for Priority 2: Access to Goods & Services.

|_|Yes |_|No

 

 

 

?????

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo #: ?????

• Add a ramp

• Regrade to 1:20 maximum slope

• Widen route

• Change route surface

• Add a platform lift, limited use/ limited application elevator or a regular elevator

 

S2

Is there a clear floor space for a person in wheelchair to turn around, i.e. a circle at least 60 inches in diameter, for at least 1 of each type of firing position?

|_|Yes |_|No

 

Measurement:

?????

 

?????

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo #: ?????

• Add space

• Move or remove partitions, fixtures or objects

• ?????